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CERTIFIED

Hi, I'm Christina and I study from Italy, I'm sfx makeup artist and I've been working in the industry for years, I've done many learning paths in schools here in Italy. I discovered SWS and I am refining my techniques a lot, I was wondering if it is possible to have a certificate of participation at the end of the courses, obviously with proof of having the skills learned! Having a certificate can help me even more here in Italy! Thank you

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    Hi @Christina Costabile it's wonderful to hear that our courses have been helping you refine your techniques! Although we appreciate that some of our students would like us to issue degrees or certificates, our on-demand video learning model is not set up to evaluate student work in that way. We feel the best thing to show a potential employer isn't a certificate or a degree, but a stellar portfolio that shows off your artistic talent. We hope you continue to enjoy your time here with us!
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    What I've been doing on my resumes is under the Education section, adding "Currently an active student of the Stan Winston School of Character Arts". Of course, like Matt said, the portfolio is what really shows that you've been learning!
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    Darrell GreenDarrell Green ✭✭✭
    edited June 29
    I fully understand the idea of having something in your hands for an interview. When so many will lie on their resume and steal a cover letter outright, it is not fun sitting talking to an interviewer who wants proof or getting as far as the interview because someone wanted proof of letters behind your name. But, the really great part of this is that Matt and @Alexander H are correct about just stating outright that you are a current SWSCA student because it lets you lead directly into "I have several current and finished projects in my portfolio and can provide physical samples, if required, but I have my full picture portfolio here, today, and would love to share it with you, especially these two that I believe will show my skills, matching the requirements in the job description." 

    Not a professional in the field but I can confirm the portfolio crosses over into most fields with a creative nature (mine is engineering/invention). All of the effects students, who post here, the ones currently in college or previously, for film and stage, always show their projects, not their credentials when interviewing for a specific job or replying to a posted job, here in the forums. Especially, matching a project they have done that shows the skills asked for in the new job. This is the same for models, actors, singers and musicians. Be sure to offer your portfolio when filling out a resume and when communicating with any recruiter.

    It has been many years ago but I remember "THE CARD", the two sided, laminated, 8.5x11 picture sheet (sometimes much smaller) that models/actors/effects folks, in Hollywood, carried with them AT ALL TIMES, in the hopes of handing it to someone important or in charge of recruiting.

    On paper, you put the name of the school and the web link to your portfolio pics but in person you hand them your CARD and they see what you badly want them to see, your work. And always be willing to let them keep it. Sometimes the person interviewing is NOT the decision maker but simply a public filter for the one who is. If the CARD makes it into your interview folder, the person behind the curtain gets it when they review the folders.

    @Matt Winston Matt, is the photo printed portfolio CARD still a thing or has this evolved? I know everyone says digital but the card seems so easy to hand to someone to get their attention without them needing to give you their contact info (this is a game stopper with a lot of execs). It has been too long since my friends were in the mix so I don't know. I guess a weblink to the same could be printed on a business card, too, and would do well placed in a job application or resume or available during interview. I used to be a pro at this HR stuff but it has been a few decades since.
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    Shannon Shea's The Business of Making Monsters courses were really great for giving perspective into applying for jobs in the industry, from the perspective of a potential recruiter. Along with having your digital portfolio ready at, say, a convention, it was also really important to have paper backups that you can whip out to show someone your work.

    I didn't have what you call "THE CARD" (sounds so mysterious!) with me when I was at my last convention, in Calgary, but I did print some high quality documents of my portfolio and put then in a display folder, with my logo stuck on front.
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    Darrell GreenDarrell Green ✭✭✭
    Shannon Shea's The Business of Making Monsters courses were really great for giving perspective into applying for jobs in the industry, from the perspective of a potential recruiter. Along with having your digital portfolio ready at, say, a convention, it was also really important to have paper backups that you can whip out to show someone your work.

    I didn't have what you call "THE CARD" (sounds so mysterious!) with me when I was at my last convention, in Calgary, but I did print some high quality documents of my portfolio and put then in a display folder, with my logo stuck on front.
    Ya, the card might not even be a thing anymore. For models, it had front view, both sides of the face, a few emotion shots and some form of full body pose. Stuff that an advertiser could use to pitch an idea and decide if you were a good fit for a particular ad or series. Effects cards and prop cards were similar but just showed off their work in short order. The card compared to a photo album as a resume is to a biography. But, times change as do professional whims.
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