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What School curriculum should I do to work in a compagny like the SWSCA?

Geoffroy  PallardyGeoffroy Pallardy Hauts-de-Seine
Hi everyone I wanted to know that since I am having my last year in high school. Thus I wanted to know which University I must choose. I live in France and it may be different from the US so if you know some names of good Univertisies tell me. I love the special effects industry and the monsters. I am a sculpter painter drawer and I can improve myself in everything and I really want to learn new stuff in this industry. Thank you for answering me ;)

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  • Accepted Answer
    Here in the US you don't have to go to school to work at a big shop like Stan's as I understand it. There are some schools here but the "degree" you get doesn't necessarily get you into a job at a shop. There are a couple of schools here that big shops will take interns from one is Cinema Makeup Schools. After talking with a bunch of industry pros, being on forums and watching the videos here with Shannon Shea, what makes you a hire-able artist is your quality of work, your versatility (how many different aspects of SPFX  you are well versed in), and the speed at which you can learn and work by yourself and with a team. What seems to be the cost effective way to learn is with the Stan Winston's School and/or the Dick Smith program were you work at home at your own speed. Being a self taught artist isn't a bad way to go. A shop in the end is going to want to see your portfolio showcasing your work, I don't think it matters to them where you learned how to do what you did but that you know it and do it well. If you really want to go school and learn in a classroom setting call up your local shops or shops that you would like to work at and ask if their is a school they prefer you to attend or what schools their employees have gone to if any. They may be able to tell you and they might not but it definitely doesn't hurt to ask.  My best advice to you is learn however you can as much as you can and put what you learn into practice. After that practice, practice, practice. 

    Good luck!

    PS. You have got to watch Shannon Shea's videos on the Stan Winston's School site on the Business of Making of Monsters. They will help you a lot.

Answers

  • Geoffroy  PallardyGeoffroy Pallardy Hauts-de-Seine
    Thank you very much for your answer
  • Chris EllerbyChris Ellerby Los Angeles Admin
    edited February 8
    The real key is building a solid portfolio of work and putting yourself out there.   Networking is super important, as knowing the right people can provide a lot of opportunities. 

    Don't be afraid to take a job sweeping up a shop or interning.  Even if that place does not work out for you, the people you work with there may be able to provide opportunities in the future.

    And with that, always be polite, honest (owning up to your mistakes, we all make them), helpful, on time, and willing to go the extra mile.  If you are a pleasure to work with, have a good attitude, and can produce quality work, people will either want to hire you or will recommend you for other opportunities.

    To build up your portfolio you can find others doing creative projects and offer to help them out. Theater, short films, student films, web productions, haunted houses, etc. 


    And I second Joshua's suggestion to check out Shannon Shea's "Business of Making Monsters" lesson series.  

    /Chris
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